Mappalicious discontinued for the time being…

rawpixel-255076-unsplashDear reader! I´ve decided to discontinue writing on Mappalicious for the time being. I´m currently going through a transition in my professional life, as well as writing on a German book on Posititive Organizational Science. For this reason, my focus and energy is needed elsewhere. This is not to say that Mappalicious as a project is finished – but I will not add any new articles at least until the second half of 2019.

Of course, you can still access all the content (…close to 600 posts…) that was generated ever since starting Mappalicious when I joined the MAPP program at University of Pennylvania in 2013. To give you a headstart in case you´ve found this site rather recently, below you´ll find a top-20 list of articles that were either read the most – or that I personally like the most. Of course, I will continue to share insights from the world of Positive Psychology (in organizations) in the meantime. Accordingly, if you haven´t done so, please follow me on Twitter, Facebook, and LinkedIn.

Reading about Positive Psychology on Mappalicious: Where to start?

  1. Great Infographic on Self-Compassion: How not to be Hard on Yourself
  2. Feel-Good vs. Feel-Purpose: Hedonia and Eudaimonia as separate but connected Pathways to Happiness
  3. “To Thine Own Self Be True”: Self-Concordance and Healthy Goal-Striving
  4. Bad is Stronger than Good! That is why our World desperately needs Positive Psychology
  5. 3 “Original” Questions for Wharton´s Adam Grant
  6. A Definition of Positive Interventions
  7. Are you a H.E.R.O.? Positive Organizational Capital (PsyCap) explained
  8. Lift! On Leading with Purpose
  9. 22 Positive Psychology-infused Articles every (HR) Leader should know
  10. The James Bond Philosophy of Life – in 007 Chapters
  11. What’s your “Ikigai”? On Purpose, Meaning, and making a Living
  12. My Mind´s MAP(P): The 4-minute Ivy League Diploma in Positive Psychology
  13. On the Meaning of Meaning at Work: A Collection of Infographics
  14. Honoring the Forefathers: Viktor Frankl and Men’s Quest for Meaning
  15. My Year in MAPP: A 5-Step Course in the fine Art of Being Un-German
  16. Following your Bliss vs. following your Blisters
  17. Feedback on Optimal Human Functioning: The Reflected Best Self Exercise™
  18. 10 fantastic Quotes by William James that preview Positive Psychology
  19. Heavy. Metal. Heart. Finding Happiness in Angry Music
  20. I´ve got 99 Words for Happiness, but the Germans only have One
Picture: unsplash.com/@rawpixel

Thank you! Danke schön! Kiitos! ¡Muchas gracias!

I’ll fly back to Germany shortly after having spent the last three days in Ann Arbor, Michigan, taking part in the Positive Business Conference 2016 (see here and here for a recap).

During these days, Mappalicious has surpassed the total number of page views for 2015 – and it’s only May. So, I just want to express my heartfelt gratitude to you for joining me on my ride across the world of Positive Psychology, for helping this baby grow, writing comments, and sharing my stuff with your friends and communities!

Nico

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10 more Blogs on Positive Psychology and adjacent You Need to Know

IMG_2317A while ago, I posted a list of 10 blogs on Positive Psychology and adjacent I frequently visit. Back then, I already said it was hard to limit the selection to only 10 sites. Therefore, here´s another curated list of cool Positive Psychology blogs. Share and enjoy!

Eric Barker writes Barking Up The Wrong Tree. He brings you science-based answers and expert insight on how to be awesome at life. His content has been featured in the New York Times, the Wall Street Journal, Wired Magazine and Time Magazine.

The Greater Good Science Center at Berkeley (co-founded by Professor Dacher Keltner) “studies the psychology, sociology, and neuroscience of well-being, and teaches skills that foster a thriving, resilient, and compassionate society”. They frequently publish articles by their own staff as well as guest articles by eminent researchers.

In their own words, The Creativity Post (co-founded by Scott Barry Kaufman) is “a non-profit web platform committed to sharing the very best content on creativity, in all of its forms: from scientific discovery to philosophical debate, from entrepreneurial ventures to educational reform, from artistic expression to technological innovation – in short, to all the varieties of the human experience that creativity brings to life.”

The Center for Positive Organizations (staff includes Professors Jane Dutton, Kim Cameron, Robert Quinn, and Gretchen Spreitzer) based at the Ross School of Business (University of Michigan) seeks to “inspire and enable leaders to build high-performing organizations that bring out the best in people. We are a catalyst for the creation and growth of positive organizations.” They regularly publish articles by the aforementioned researchers and scholars in Positive Organizational Scholarship.

Paula Davis-Laack is a fellow Penn MAPP alum and writes a regular column called Pressure Proof about “strategies and stories for busy, complicated lives” on Psychology Today.

In their own words, The Pursuit of Happiness is a “group of psychologists, philosophers, educators, and web professionals dedicated to the advancement of scientific knowledge about happiness and depression prevention. We provide science-based information on life skills and habits needed to enhance well-being, build resilience against depression and anxiety, and pursue a meaningful life.” Professor Todd Kashdan is one of the contributors.

Happiness by Design is a column on Psychology Today by London School of Economics´ Professor Paul Dolan. It doesn’t update very often by the posts are cool to read.

Action for Happiness is a movement of people committed to building a happier and more caring society. We want to see a fundamentally different way of life – where people care less about what they can get just for themselves and more about the happiness of others. Sir Richard Layard is among the founders. They publish compelling pieces by top-tier Positive Psychology researchers and experts in their news section.

To my mind, Michael Tomoff is one of the few people who write stuff worth reading on Positive Psychology in German. His blog is called Was wäre wenn? (What if?).

The last one is a sort of honorable mention. The late Professor Christopher Peterson published an immensely insightful and oftentimes very funny Positive Psychology blog via Psychology Today called The Good Life. Even though it has not been updated ever since 2012 (for obvious reasons), I revisit it frequently for inspiration.

Positive Psychology Blogs around the Globe

World_FlagRecently, I´ve posted an article listing my ten favorite Positive Psychology blogs – and afterwards, I realized that all of them are US-based. And while most researchers and practitioners certainly live/work there, there´s lots of good stuff to be discovered in other parts of the world (and of course, on other languages than English). Even, if you don´t speak French, Spanish or the like, by using sites like Google Translate, you´ll be able to understand it all.

Here are some suggestions:

Share and enjoy!

P.S.

If you know Positive Psychology blogs from around the world that post regularly and displaying high quality content, please leave a comment…

10 must-read Blogs on Positive Psychology and adjacent

IMG_2317Truth be told: it was pretty hard to limit my selection of Positive Psychology blogs to only ten because there´s so much good stuff out there. But if I look to those that I read most frequently, it probably the following list. Share and enjoy!

Positive Prescription by Samantha Boardman is a blog that shares helpful practical advice for different aspects of life based on Positive Psychology; oftentimes also very funny.

Dan Bowling, a former SVP of HR at Coke, writes a witty and Positive Psychology-infused blog about Talent Management.

Todd Kashdan is a professor at George Mason University and co-author of “The Upside of Your Darkside” (among other books). He regularly writes about Positive Psychology via Psychology Today.

High Existence created by Jordan Lejuwaan is a multi-author blog on personal development and life hacks – some of the authors seem to be influenced by Positive Psychology. I frequently read their articles which are crafted exceptionally well (if you ask me…).

Mark Manson blogs about a wide array of personal development topics. He’s seems not to be directly influenced by Positive Psychology – but I love his no-bulls..t attitude towards this oftentimes rather shallow topic.

Ryan Niemiec, Education Director of the VIA Institute on Character, regularly blogs via Psychology Today, mostly on the science and application of character strengths.

Seph Fontane Pennock runs the site PositivePsychologyProgram.com, a great resource when you are looking for courses and study programs on that topic. But the site also contains a blog where he writes articles, interviews researchers, or hosts pieces written by a variety of guest authors.

Robert Quinn, co-founder of the Center for Positive Organizations at the Ross School (University of Michigan) writes about Positive Organizational Scholarship via The Positive Organization.

Emma Seppälä is Science Director of the Center for Compassion and Altruism Research and Education (CCARE) at Stanford University. She blogs via Psychology Today, oftentimes on mindfulness, meditation, and compassion.

Brett Steenbarger writes on Success via Forbes, especially in the field of stock trading – yet he often peppers his entertaining pieces with research on Positive Psychology.

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Honorable mention: Fulfillment Daily, a multi-author site run by Emma Seppälä. I write for them occasionally, so it would have been cheesy to put it in the actual list.

Please like my new Facebook Page

Dear Mappalicious Visitor!

In the past, I ran a Mappalicious Facebook page where I basically re-posted all the articles that I’ve published on this blog.

Recently, I’ve decided to abandon this site. The reason is that I also publish regularly on other outlets, sometimes on topics that are not directly related to Positive Psychology.

In order to have “everything in one place” in the future, I’ve created a new Facebook page that is directly associated with my name: Dr. Nico Rose on Facebook Therefore, if would like to be notified about new Positive Psychology content via Facebook regularly, I kindly ask you to “like” this new page.

You can find it here.

Thank you!

Dr. Nico Rose

A mappalicious THANK YOU to all my Readers worldwide

Mappalicious PageviewsToday, I´d just like to say THANK YOU! to all those people who have visited Mappalicious in the past (and hopefully, will continue to do so…). Why?

Because yesterday has been the most successful day ever for my little blog project, and also August 2015 has been the month with the most visitors and page views – by far. All in all, more some 11,000 visitors created 16,000 page views during that period. Now, 11.000 visitors in a month is literally nothing compared to the numbers of big news outlets or super-successful blogs like Brainpickings – but Mappalicious is just my little fun project that I run on the side, while being a corporate manager, part-time coach/speaker, and of course husband and dad.

To me, it just feels incredible to be able to put my brilliant thoughts the brilliant thoughts of other people on this page so they can be found and read by friends and total strangers all over the world. I´m from this tiny town in Germany, and thanks to my participation in the Penn MAPP program, suddenly people from literally all over the world read my stuff. Isn’t that absolutely fantastic? Via the graph (click to enlarge) you can see where most of my page view came from this month. I find it absolutely staggering that, for instance, somebody in Jakarta will be able to read these lines once I´ve clicked on “submit” in a couple of minutes from now.

This is the true power and upside of the internet: giving those people a voice who otherwise would not be heard.