Feedback? You´re doing fine! Just keep on going…

A good friend of mine, Vivian Wagner, has founded a non-profit organization called 1World Social Capital Program (1WSCP). 1WSCP offers mentoring to aspiring female professionals and students, helping them to grow their social capital with 12 highly regarded and successful mentors who are doing amazing work to break the glass ceiling for women all around the world.

1WSCP regularly posts short videos of leaders who share important learning experiences from the careers. For my video, Vivian asked me to specifically think about how we can elevate and uplift the people around us.

I share a story that took place while still studying Positive Psychology at Penn. The video contains a shout-out to Professor Jane Dutton from the Center for Positive Organizations who facilitated our learning experience that day. An older written account of that experience can be found here.

Share and enjoy!

Welcome to the Center for Positive Organizations

CPO_LogoSo, I’m sharing a commercial video here. Yes, that’s not the usual content on Mappalicious.

It’s just that so many of my academic heroes are gathered in this video (and thus, at the CPO, e.g. Robert Quinn, Jane Dutton, and Kim Cameron) that I’m actually eager to share it. The CPO is a fabulous place to learn. I know this ever since taking part in their Positive Business Conference in May.

Please also check out their fabulous website. They host a wide array of Positive Psychology resources, e.g., this extensive list of research papers on Positive Organizational Science.

Compassion and Business: How does that go together?

The word compassion sounds “soft”. It invokes images of praying Buddhist monks, nurses taking care of the feeble, or a priest administering the last rites to a dying person. What surely doesn´t come to mind is the picture of a corporate boardroom, right? But why?

When we walk into to the office in the morning and someone asks us “How are you?” we´re supposed to say something along the lines of: “Fine! How about you?” It´s part of the language game in the corporate world. We know this. At the same time, we all know that quite often, people are presenting a white lie at this point. We know this very well precisely because we do the same every once in a while. We say “I´m fine” even when things clearly aren´t fine at all.

Life can be a bitch. Our loved ones become sick or pass away. We fight with our spouses, our children, our parents, our neighbors. There are bills to pay and sometimes the end of the month is still too far away. Hell, the Warriors lose to the Cavs after a 3:1 lead in the NBA finals. It´s tough.

This emotional load – we bring it into the office, no matter if we admit it or if we decide to cover up. Most people indeed choose to cover up – as somehow, someone decided a hundred years ago that businesses ought to be rational places, spaces where emotions don´t belong or even disrupt normal functioning (whatever that is…).

The problem is: It´s just not possible. People cannot shut down their emotions at discretion. At least not for longer periods of time – and certainly not without paying a price.

There is always pain in the room.

This sentence was coined by the late management professor Peter Frost, one of the pioneers studying and advocating compassion in business settings. It´s a quite powerful proposition, even though (Or maybe: because?) it states something very obvious. Shit happens to the best of us. We suffer – and sometimes, it takes us a long time to cope. We feel pain and sorrow and those feelings don’t bother to ask us if we are currently at work or at home.

So, how should managers and co-workers react? The common rules of business tell us to ignore or downplay the issue but in most cases, that´s not what really helps.

Not showing our suffering or downplaying the suffering of our colleagues is a perfect example of what Finnish philosopher Esa Saarinen calls a system of holding back in return and advance. We don’t openly display our suffering because we expect from prior interactions that it will not be acted upon appropriately. Meanwhile, the others see no need to act compassionately as everything seems to be OK. Ad infinitum. And the longer this “non-reciprocity circle” is in place, the harder it becomes for an individual to make a first move in order to interrupt the chain of neglect.

Another way would be to act compassionately: To notice the negative feelings of our co-workers, to feel empathetic concern, and to act accordingly. Compassion does not equal to fully experiencing the same feelings as the person we´re compassionate to.

Put in a straight-forward way…

…being compassionate means to be willing to imagine how it would feel like to walk some miles in another person´s shoes – and then, upon recognizing this would probably be hurtful, trying to appropriately mitigate that pain or suffering.

That´s it. It´s not a mystic thing – and we don´t have to mediate in a cave for 20 years before we´re able to pull off that stunt.

We know how to be compassionate even before we can ride a bike. Small children act compassionately by nature. When they see another child crying, they instinctively show signs of distress – and then they try to help with their restricted means, e.g., by caressing their counterpart or sharing a toy.

But somehow, this get´s lost as we get our high school diplomas, university degrees – and then move on to become business people. Which is a pity, because businesses create a lot of pain themselves – it´s not all from our private lives. People suffer because they don’t get that promotion, because their buddies get laid off, or just because co-workers, or even worse, bosses behave in outright toxic ways. Again, we all know this to some degree.

Here´s the point: Science shows over and over again that by carelessly ignoring these emotional dynamics, businesses are hurting the bottom line. If you want to know how, I´d like to point you towards this superb review article written by science rock star Jane Dutton of University of Michigan´s Center for Positive Organizations and some colleagues (that´s also where I “stole” the graphic from):

Dutton, J. E., Workman, K. M., & Hardin, A. E. (2014). Compassion at Work. Annual Reviews of Organizational Psychology and Organizational Behavior, 1(1), 277-304.

annurev-orgpsych-031413-091221_f1

Passion. Purpose. Performance. Positive Business Conference (Day 1)

I’m absolutely thrilled to be at the University of Michigan, attending this year’s Positive Business Conference at Ross School of Business.This post is my personal summary of the conference’s first day, brought to you via some of the tweets I’ve put out there…

Prof. Vic Strecher shared some really intriguing upsides of having a strong purpose in life. More importantly, you should check out his fabulous app JOOL.

Prof. Jane Dutton had me change my mind on using the term rockstar only in contexts that involve electric guitars. She shared with us her Flourishing Triangle framework of organizational effectiveness.

I was equally thrilled to be able to learn directly from Prof. Alex Edmans, whose work on the financial impact of treating employees exceptionally well has been covered extensively on Mappalicious.

Prof. Joe Arvai shared some incredible research on how to help consumers make more ethical buying decisions. E.g., why is that we can consciously choose from what part of the world our coffee comes from (and how it was cultivated) – but not with regard to our gasoline? And what if we could

After lunch, I was thrilled to have the opportunity of attending a workshop led by Prof. Robert Quinn whose blog posts I share frequently via my Positive Psychology News Digests.

Once more it became clear to me that we do not really understand “a thing” (even if we’ve heard about it a lot of times) until somebody explains it to us in the exactly right words at the right time.

When you’re in the right space, the smartest “person” in the room is the room itself.

Jim Miller, VP at Google, shared insights on the special culture that drives the incredible success of the company.

Of course, there were more sessions, and more speakers, and an abundance of inspiring conversations while having delicious food – but I cannot cover it all here.

Yet, one last thing I found out is this:

Share and enjoy!

Positive Business Conference

Your first and foremost Job as a Leader is… Peter Drucker​ on Positive Organizations

I guess it must be really hard to be a management guru these days. No matter what you say, no matter how brilliant you are – there’s a very high probability that somebody will already have laid out what your core message is. And with “somebody”, I don’t refer to a lot of people, I’m just talking about one person: Peter Drucker.

If you visit, e.g., his notable quotes on GoodReads, you’ll find that he was an incredibly smart thinker – and the he basically laid out all the principles of modern (and in some instances: post-modern) management (in the best sense of the word…). And he did all of that mostly during the 1950s and 60s!

Last week, I stumbled upon a quote that gives rise to the assumption Peter Drucker was also able to foresee some of the developments in Positive Organizational Scholarship (POS), e.g.,  Jane Dutton’s concept of High-Quality Connections, or Kim Cameron’s idea of leading by managing Organizational Energy.

Here are some additional quotes alluding to the rise of Positive Organizations:

Peter Drucker on Positive Deviance and High-Quality Connections

Leadership is lifting a person’s vision to higher sights, the raising of a person’s performance to a higher standard, the building of a personality beyond its normal limitations.

—–

The work relationship has to be based on mutual respect. Psychological despotism is basically contemptuous—far more contemptuous than the traditional Theory X. It does not assume that people are lazy and resist work, but it assumes that the manager is healthy while everybody else is sick. It assumes that the manager is strong while everybody else is weak. It assumes that the manager knows while everybody else is ignorant. It assumes that the manager is right, whereas everybody else is stupid. These are the assumptions of foolish arrogance.

—–

The leaders who work most effectively, it seems to me, never say “I.” And that’s not because they have trained themselves not to say “I.” They don’t think “I.” They think “we”; they think “team.” They understand their job to be to make the team function. They accept responsibility and don’t sidestep it, but “we” gets the credit. This is what creates trust, what enables you to get the task done.

Peter Drucker on Strength Orientation

A person can perform only from strength. One cannot build performance on weakness, let alone on something one cannot do at all.

—–

We all have a vast number of areas in which we have no talent or skill and little chance of becoming even mediocre. In those areas a knowledge workers should not take on work, jobs and assignments. It takes far more energy to improve from incompetence to mediocrity than it takes to improve from first-rate performance to excellence.

—–

A man should never be appointed to a managerial position if his vision focuses on people’s weaknesses rather than on their strengths. The man who always knows exactly what people cannot do, but never sees anything they can do, will undermine the spirit of his organization.

Peter Drucker on Purpose

An organization is not, like an animal, an end in itself, and successful by the mere act of perpetuating the species. An organization is an organ of society and fulfills itself by the contribution it makes to the outside environment.

—–

Only a clear, focused, and common mission can hold the organization together and enable it to produce results.

Peter Drucker on Self-Knowledge and the Growth Mindset

Success in the knowledge economy comes to those who know themselves – their strengths, their values, and how they best perform.

—–

People in general, and knowledge workers in particular, grow according to the demands they make on themselves. They grow according to what they consider to be achievement and attainment. If they demand little of themselves, they will remain stunted. If they demand a good deal of themselves, they will grow to giant stature—without any more effort than is expended by the nonachievers.

Positive Psychology News Digest on Mappalicious | No. 14/2016

My favorite pieces covering Positive Psychology and adjacent from (roughly) the last seven days:

Center for Positive Organizations: Understanding positive business: Learning how to lead by Sue Ashford


Economist: Your employees wish you were emotionally intelligent by Natalie Baker


Center for Positive Organizations: Respectful engagement cultivates higher levels of creativity by Jane Dutton et al.


Psychology Today: The Shortcut to Finding Pleasure from Pain by Todd Kashdan


Huffington Post (Lifestyle): Simplicity, Free Time and Pursuing Your Passions by Taylor Kreiss


The Positive Organization: The Power of Self-Change via Robert Quinn


Vox: How scientists fell in and out of love with the hormone oxytocin by Brian Resnick


New York Times: The Keys to Happiness by Victoria Shannon


Forbes: Living Life With Renewed Energy: The Purpose Of Purpose by Brett Steenbarger


Huffington Post: 6 Quick Steps for Finding Your Company’s Authentic Purpose by Vic Strecher

News Digest - Mappalicious

Positive Psychology News Digest | January – March (+130 Articles)

Mappalicious_Wordle_Q1_16Just in case you´ve missed some of my weekly updates – here are all the featured Positive Psychology-related articles from January to March 2016:

Time: The Most Inspiring Way to Be Happier and More Motivated by Eric Barker


New York Times: Don’t Grade Schools on Grit by Angela Duckworth


Harvard Business Review: 28 Years of Stock Market Data Shows a Link Between Employee Satisfaction and Long-Term Value by Alex Edmans


Tech.co: Study Finds Inner Kindness Is the Key to Success, Happiness by Cameron Glover (feat. Emma Seppälä)


Psychology Today: Why Is Happiness Fleeting? by Itai Ivtzan


The Atlantic: One Simple Phrase That Turns Anxiety Into Success by Olga Khazan


The Telegraph: Mental illness mostly caused by life events not genetics, argue psychologists by Sarah Knapton


The Guardian: Three things you think will make you happier at work (but won’t) by Charlotte Seager


TLNT: Is A Happy Workplace One Of Your Core Values? by Ron Thomas


Fast Company: How To Design Happiness: Experts from Lippincott, Disney, and SoulCycle weigh in on how they craft happy experiences by Mark Wilson


Greater Good Science Center: How Happy Brains Respond to Negative Things by Summer Allen & Jeremy Adam Smith


Fortune: The Massive Difference between Negative and Positive Leadership by Bill George


Washington Post: Why smart people are better off with fewer friends by Christopher Ingraham


Psychology Today: Where does the Word “Mindfulness” come from? by Tim Lomas


Philly.com: Swarthmore colleagues, students choose to honor an expert (Barry Schwartz) on choices by Justine McDaniel


Greater Good Science Center: Why Does Happiness Inequality Matter? by Kira Newman


Huffington Post UK: World Happiness Report 2016 Update – Five Key Implications for Education by Frederika Roberts


Forbes: How To Be A Happier Human Being Even When You’re Failing by Brett Steenbarger


Time/Money: Watching cat videos at work could make you more productive by Martha White


Huffington Post: Why Governments Should Stay Out of the Happiness Business by Ruth Wippman


Greater Good Science Center: You Will Never Find Work-Life Balance by Christine Carter


New York Times: Denmark Ranks as Happiest Country; Burundi, Not So Much by Sewell Chan


Fulfillment Daily: Happiness at Work: Get a Big Boost from Small Frequent Pleasures by Ron Friedman


Psychology Today: How Can Positive Psychology Be More Open to the Negative? by Todd Kashdan


Psychology Today : Expectations, Dopamine and Louis CK by Alex Korb


Quartz: This four-letter word is the Swedish key to happiness at work by Anne Quito


Huffington Post (Education): Why Being Tired of Grit is Tiresome by Stuart Rhoden


Chicago Tribune: Stanford psychologist tells us how to fight workplace burnout by Nara Schoenberg


Intelligent HQ: Why is Positive Psychology So Misunderstood? by Ana Teresa Silva


New York Times: Rethinking the Work-Life Equation by Susan Dominus


Inc: 7 things remarkably happy people do every single day by Peter Economy


Slate: A whole field of psychology research may be bunk by Daniel Engber


Brookings: Some good news for International Women’s Day: Women are (usually) happier than men by Carol Graham


Harvard Business Review: How to practice mindfulness throughout your workday by Rasmus Hougaard & Jacqueline Carter


Psychology Today: Positive Psychology: What Does “Positive” Mean? by Itai Ivtzan


Rewire Happiness: Transformative Technologies and Their Impact on Well-Being by Sophie Janicke


NPR: Is ‘Grit’ Doomed To Be The New Self-Esteem? by Anya Kamenetz


Washington Post: The worst kind of boss is not the one who’s always a jerk by Jena McGregor


Irish Times: Can you teach wellbeing? Martin Seligman thinks so by Ronan McGreevy


The Psych Report: The Paradoxes of Creativity: Sensitive Rockers, Mindful Daydreamers, and Celebrated Outcasts by Evan Nesterak


New York Times (Well): Why Doctors Care About Happiness by Danielle Ofri


Evening Standard: Older people are ‘happier in their late 60s’ by Hannah Al-Othman


PsyBlog: How To Naturally Boost The Brain Chemicals Sapped By Depression by Jeremy Dean


Quartz: Neuroscience says these five rituals will help your brain stay in peak condition by Vivian Giang


Positive Psychology News Daily: Workplace Positivity? What’s the Right Amount? And Why? by Donna Hemmert


Inc: Want to Be Truly Happy? Harvard Researchers Say This Is the One Thing You Need by Bill Murphy Jr.


Wharton Knowledge: The New Success Track: Happiness by Emma Seppälä


Huffington Post UK: It is Time to Embrace Stress as a Mental Wellbeing Issue by Simon Stevens


Greater Good Science Center: How Nature Can Make You Kinder, Happier, and More Creative by Jill Suttie


Fast Company: 7 ways turn your current job into your dream Job by Stephanie Vozza


New York Times: Testing for Joy and Grit? Schools Nationwide Push to Measure Students’ Emotional Skills by Kate Zernike


Washington Post: We all know exercise makes you live longer. But this will actually get you off the Couch by David Brown


Harvard Business Review: How to Build a Culture of Originality by Adam Grant


Psychology Today: Second Wave Positive Psychology: An Introduction by Tim Lomas


Think Advisor: Advisors in Pursuit of Happiness by Olivia Mellan


Psychology Today: Being Positive: It’s Not Mindfulness, It’s Savoring by Ryan Niemiec


Psychology Today: 4 Science-Backed Tips For Achieving Your Dreams by Emma Seppälä


Psychology Today: The Hard Data on Self-Love and Why It Leads to Success by Emma Seppälä


MIT Technology Review: First Evidence for the Happiness Paradox: That Your Friends Are Happier than You Are, no author


Inc: 11 Signs You Have the Grit You Need to Succeed by Travis Bradberry


Forbes: The Surprising Power Of Appreciation At Work by Chris Cancialosi


Greater Good Science Center: Can Helping Others Help You Find Meaning in Life? by Elizabeth Hopper


New Yorker: How People Learn to Become Resilient by Maria Konnikova


Wall Street Journal: ‘Resilience’ skills help you remain positive and productive under stress by Laura Landro


Forbes: Amy Cuddy: How Leaders Can Be More Present In The Workplace by Dan Schawbel


Boston Globe: How nice bosses get ahead by Emma Seppälä


Washington Post: What people around the world mean when they say they’re happy by Ana Swanson


Psychology Today: Re-setting Your Happiness Set Point Part 1 | Part 2 by Linda and Charlie Bloom


Talent Management: 6 Resolutions for Career Happiness in 2016 by Dan Bowling


PsyBlog: 33 Surprisingly Simple Things That Make People Happiest by Jeremy Dean


NBC News: United Arab Emirates Names Official ‘Minister for Happiness’ by Alex Johnson


Scientific American: How to Be an Optimal Human by Scott Barry Kaufman


Scientific American Mind: Can Positive Thinking Be Negative? by Scott Lilienfeld


The Guardian: Banish those midlife blues – the secret to happiness starts with one small step by Tracy McVeigh


Washington Post: The end of college rankings as we know them by Jeffrey Selingo


Washington Post: A Stanford psychologist explains why spacing out and goofing off is so good for you by Emma Seppälä


Penn Current: Penn professor explores what it means to be positive by Michele Berger


Financial Times: Companies with a purpose beyond profit tend to make more money by Simon Caulkin


Greater Good Science Center: Five Ways to Put Self-Compassion into Therapy by Tim Desmond


Gizmodo: English is Surprisingly Devoid of Emotionally Positive Words by George Dvorsky


New York Times: How to Raise a Creative Child. Step One: Back Off by Adam Grant


Psychology Today: Is It a Good Idea To Build on Signature Strengths? by Todd Kashdan


Scientific American: The Differences Between Happiness and Meaning in Life by Scott Barry Kaufman


Psychology Today: Can You Help Others Find Meaning In Their Work? by Michelle McQuaid


Cosmopolitan: 12 Ways to Feel Happier at Work – Yes, even at the job you hate by Judith Ohikuare


Psychology Today: The Surprising Link Between Compassion and Success by Emma Seppälä


Forbes: How To Light The Fire When You’re Burned Out by Brett Steenbarger


New York Times: You Are Stronger Than You (and Your Therapist) Think by Michael Bennett


Scientific American: The Science of Healing Thoughts by Gareth Cook


The Guardian: Is mindfulness making us ill? by Dawn Foster


Penn Current: Q&A with Scott Barry Kaufman by Lauren Hertzler


Stanford GSB: Should Employees Design Their Own Jobs? by Louise Lee


Fast Company: It takes more than just being a good person yourself to inspire ethical conduct in employees by David Mayer


Knowledge@Wharton: Why Compassion Serves You Better Than Self-interest by Emma Seppälä


Fast Company: The Surprising Link Between Compassion And Success by Emma Seppälä


Forbes: One Powerful Step That Can Turn Around Your Trading Psychology by Brett Steenbarger


Greater Good Science Center: What Doesn’t Kill You Makes You Kinder by Jill Suttie


Quartz: The Stanford professor who pioneered praising kids for effort says we’ve totally missed the point by Jenny Anderson


Harvard Business Review: Manage your Emotional Culture by Sigal Barsade & Olivia O’Neill


Harvard Business Review: We Learn More When We Learn Together by Jane Dutton & Emily Heaphy


New York Times: Why I Taught Myself to Procrastinate by Adam Grant


Fulfillment Daily: The Surprising Benefit Of Going Through Hard Times by Carolyn Gregoire


PositiveSharing.com: The 5 most important findings from the science of happiness that apply at work by Alexander Kjerulf


Forbes: Mapping World Happiness And Conflict Through Global News And Image Mining by Kalev Leetaru


Psychology Today: The One Thing To Know About Happiness by Andrea Polard


Psychology Today: 6 Surefire Ways To Increase Your Charisma – Backed by Science by Emma Seppälä


New York Times: Having Friends Is Good for You, Starting in Your Teens by Nicholas Bakalar


Quartz: In our pursuit of happiness, Americans are losing sight of what actually makes us happy by Geoff Chang


Forbes: How To Bring Presence To Your Biggest Challenges by Paula Davis-Laack


Harvard Business Review: Income Inequality Makes Whole Countries Less Happy by Jan-Emmanuel De Neve &  Powdthavee Nattavudh


BPS Research Digest: Follow your heart – Having an unanswered calling in life is worse than having no calling at all by Alex Fradera


New York Magazine: How Expressing Gratitude Might Change Your Brain by Christian Jarrett


Washington Post: Your relationships are just as important to your health as diet and exercise by Elahe Izadi


Huffington Post: The science of happiness: Everything you need to know about the feeling we all crave by Jason March et al.


New York Times: ‘Design Thinking’ for a Better You by Tara Parker-Pope


Fast Company: Countries Do Get Happier When They Get Richer–But Only If They Share The Wealth by Ben Schiller


Wall Street Journal: Latest Game Theory: Mixing Work and Play by Rachel Emma Silverman


Greater Good Science Center: How Humility Will Make You the Greatest Person Ever by Vicki Zakrzewski


Science Daily: Brain can be trained to regulate negative emotions, study shows, no author


New York Magazine: 3 Insights From a New Book About Creativity by Melissa Dahl


Psychology Today: 10 Questions to Help You Reflect on 2015 by Paula Davis-Laack


Harvard Business Review: Strengths-Based Coaching Can Actually Weaken You by Tomas Chamorro-Premuzic


New York Times: How to Cultivate the Art of Serendipity by Pagan Kennedy


Business Insider: A Harvard psychiatrist says 3 things are the secret to real happiness by Tanya Lewis


Greater Good Science Center: To Change Yourself, Change Your World by Kira Newman


Psychology Today: 3 Things Extraordinary Leaders Do by Emma Seppälä


Fulfillment Daily: The Joy of Imperfection: How Not to Drive Yourself and Others Nuts in 2016 by Mona Shah Joshi


Positive Psychology News Daily: Instead of a Resolution, Try a New Year Routine by Jan Stanley


Forbes: The Positive Psychology Of Job Interviewing by Brett Steenbarger

News Digest - Mappalicious

3 “Original” Questions for Wharton´s Adam Grant

Adam Grant is a professor at Wharton Business School and also teaches in the Master of Positive Psychology program at Penn. His new book Originals: How Non-Conformists Move the World has recently been published. It´s about creativity and how we all can bring daring ideas to life.

 

Adam_Grant_Quote_1Adam, you’re a scientist. According to philosopher Thomas Kuhn’s theory of paradigm shifts it’s particularly tough to be original in this domain because your own community might be incentivized to hold bold ideas down. What’s your (give and) take on this?

When I first read Kuhn as a freshman in college, I was stunned by his argument that major scientific advances don’t take hold until a generation of old scientists clinging to old theories literally dies out. At the time, I believed him, but now I think he was only partially right. In many scientific fields, it’s extremely difficult to publish work that doesn’t challenge the status quo. We want to discover new knowledge, not replicate existing knowledge. There may be a small group of gatekeepers who are invested in their pet theories, but the larger scientific community favors fresh insights. Why, then, do so many scientists face opposition to their oppositional ideas? Building on what I wrote in chapter 2 of Originals, my bet is that it’s less about incentives and more about cognitive entrenchment: scientists become so convinced of prevailing theories that they literally have a hard time seeing alternative possibilities. Look at Einstein: after ushering in his revolutionary ideas about relativity, he resisted the quantum revolution in physics. “To punish me for my contempt for authority,” Einstein reflected, “fate made me an authority myself.”

Adam Grant - OriginalsCultures may vary significantly as to the extent they value non-conformism and standing out. I´m German – we´re a decidedly Western society but still, I feel, the general public adheres to “being sensible and staying with the flock”. What´s your advice here for the “dreamers and the doers”?

The more a culture values conformity, the more important it becomes to master the art of tempered radicalism.

First, make your unfamiliar ideas more familiar by connecting them to things that people already understand – like pitching The Lion King as “Hamlet with lions” or Warby Parker as “We’re going to do for glasses what Zappos did for shoes.”
Second, instead of trying to convince other people to change their values, show them how your idea appeals to values they already hold.
Third, reframe following you as an act of conformity by leveraging the power of social proof: show them that other people like them are already on board with your idea.
And fourth, don’t forget that there’s often more variance within cultures as between them. Find the bright spots, as Chip and Dan Heath say in Switch.  Then, to borrow a term from Jane Dutton, build a micro-community of people who embrace originality.

Adam Grant - QuoteFrom the author´s perspective: What´s the most original chapter in “Originals” – and why?

In form, I think chapter 3 is the most original. I had great fun building in a surprise that I will not spoil here. In content, I’d say the most contrarian ideas are in chapter 5, where I argue that common goals drive groups apart instead of binding them together (this helps to explain why vegans hate vegetarians even more than they dislike meat eaters) and revealing your purpose can make you less persuasive (this is why Elon Musk didn’t start SpaceX by telling people he wanted to go to Mars).

 

Thanks a lot, Adam – and best of luck with your new book!

10 more Blogs on Positive Psychology and adjacent You Need to Know

IMG_2317A while ago, I posted a list of 10 blogs on Positive Psychology and adjacent I frequently visit. Back then, I already said it was hard to limit the selection to only 10 sites. Therefore, here´s another curated list of cool Positive Psychology blogs. Share and enjoy!

Eric Barker writes Barking Up The Wrong Tree. He brings you science-based answers and expert insight on how to be awesome at life. His content has been featured in the New York Times, the Wall Street Journal, Wired Magazine and Time Magazine.

The Greater Good Science Center at Berkeley (co-founded by Professor Dacher Keltner) “studies the psychology, sociology, and neuroscience of well-being, and teaches skills that foster a thriving, resilient, and compassionate society”. They frequently publish articles by their own staff as well as guest articles by eminent researchers.

In their own words, The Creativity Post (co-founded by Scott Barry Kaufman) is “a non-profit web platform committed to sharing the very best content on creativity, in all of its forms: from scientific discovery to philosophical debate, from entrepreneurial ventures to educational reform, from artistic expression to technological innovation – in short, to all the varieties of the human experience that creativity brings to life.”

The Center for Positive Organizations (staff includes Professors Jane Dutton, Kim Cameron, Robert Quinn, and Gretchen Spreitzer) based at the Ross School of Business (University of Michigan) seeks to “inspire and enable leaders to build high-performing organizations that bring out the best in people. We are a catalyst for the creation and growth of positive organizations.” They regularly publish articles by the aforementioned researchers and scholars in Positive Organizational Scholarship.

Paula Davis-Laack is a fellow Penn MAPP alum and writes a regular column called Pressure Proof about “strategies and stories for busy, complicated lives” on Psychology Today.

In their own words, The Pursuit of Happiness is a “group of psychologists, philosophers, educators, and web professionals dedicated to the advancement of scientific knowledge about happiness and depression prevention. We provide science-based information on life skills and habits needed to enhance well-being, build resilience against depression and anxiety, and pursue a meaningful life.” Professor Todd Kashdan is one of the contributors.

Happiness by Design is a column on Psychology Today by London School of Economics´ Professor Paul Dolan. It doesn’t update very often by the posts are cool to read.

Action for Happiness is a movement of people committed to building a happier and more caring society. We want to see a fundamentally different way of life – where people care less about what they can get just for themselves and more about the happiness of others. Sir Richard Layard is among the founders. They publish compelling pieces by top-tier Positive Psychology researchers and experts in their news section.

To my mind, Michael Tomoff is one of the few people who write stuff worth reading on Positive Psychology in German. His blog is called Was wäre wenn? (What if?).

The last one is a sort of honorable mention. The late Professor Christopher Peterson published an immensely insightful and oftentimes very funny Positive Psychology blog via Psychology Today called The Good Life. Even though it has not been updated ever since 2012 (for obvious reasons), I revisit it frequently for inspiration.

Two new Articles by Dr. Nico Rose on Positive Psychology in the Workplace

Dr. Nico RoseFor my German-speaking readers: I’ve recently published two articles in Positive Psychology in the workplace.

The first one covers the antecedents and consequences of Flow at work. It was published online by the German psychology magazine EMOTION.

The second one is an overview of several concepts in the realm of Positive Psychology in business and features the work of Martin Seligman, Barbara Fredrickson, Jane Dutton, Roy Baumeister, and Shawn Achor.

Share and enjoy!