10 must-read Blogs on Positive Psychology and adjacent

IMG_2317Truth be told: it was pretty hard to limit my selection of Positive Psychology blogs to only ten because there´s so much good stuff out there. But if I look to those that I read most frequently, it probably the following list. Share and enjoy!

Positive Prescription by Samantha Boardman is a blog that shares helpful practical advice for different aspects of life based on Positive Psychology; oftentimes also very funny.

Dan Bowling, a former SVP of HR at Coke, writes a witty and Positive Psychology-infused blog about Talent Management.

Todd Kashdan is a professor at George Mason University and co-author of “The Upside of Your Darkside” (among other books). He regularly writes about Positive Psychology via Psychology Today.

High Existence created by Jordan Lejuwaan is a multi-author blog on personal development and life hacks – some of the authors seem to be influenced by Positive Psychology. I frequently read their articles which are crafted exceptionally well (if you ask me…).

Mark Manson blogs about a wide array of personal development topics. He’s seems not to be directly influenced by Positive Psychology – but I love his no-bulls..t attitude towards this oftentimes rather shallow topic.

Ryan Niemiec, Education Director of the VIA Institute on Character, regularly blogs via Psychology Today, mostly on the science and application of character strengths.

Seph Fontane Pennock runs the site PositivePsychologyProgram.com, a great resource when you are looking for courses and study programs on that topic. But the site also contains a blog where he writes articles, interviews researchers, or hosts pieces written by a variety of guest authors.

Robert Quinn, co-founder of the Center for Positive Organizations at the Ross School (University of Michigan) writes about Positive Organizational Scholarship via The Positive Organization.

Emma Seppälä is Science Director of the Center for Compassion and Altruism Research and Education (CCARE) at Stanford University. She blogs via Psychology Today, oftentimes on mindfulness, meditation, and compassion.

Brett Steenbarger writes on Success via Forbes, especially in the field of stock trading – yet he often peppers his entertaining pieces with research on Positive Psychology.

———-

Honorable mention: Fulfillment Daily, a multi-author site run by Emma Seppälä. I write for them occasionally, so it would have been cheesy to put it in the actual list.

5 essential brand-new & upcoming Books on Positive Psychology

Are you eager to get some fresh perspectives on Positive Psychology? Here you go…

Recently published books on Positive Psychology

Michelle Gielan: Broadcasting Happiness: The Science of Igniting and Sustaining Positive Change. Michelle is a former CBS News anchor and is a Penn MAPP alum. About the book:

“In Broadcasting Happiness, Gielan shows us how our words can move people from fearbased mindsets, where they see obstacles as insurmountable, to positive mindsets, where they see that change is possible and take action. Using scientifically proven communication strategies, we have the ability to increase others’ happiness and success at work, as well as our own, instantly making us more effective leaders.”

Shannon Polly & Kathryn Britton (Eds.): Character Strengths Matter: How to Live a Full Life. Shannon and Kathryn are also Penn MAPP graduates working at the intersection of research and consulting. About the book:

The book brings Peterson´s and Seligman´s character strengths “to life with stories involving children, teenagers, adults, and elders and occurring in family life and business settings, in the present and in the distant past, in locations from China to the United States to the Middle East. Research shows that using character strengths in new ways for a week makes people happier up to six months later. This book includes many ideas for using your character strengths in new ways.”

J. Harold Ellens, Theo D. McCall & David Bryce Yaden (Eds.): Being Called: Scientific, Secular, and Sacred Perspectives. David was an assistant instructor in during my stay in the Penn MAPP program and has his own Mappsterview. About the book:

“This unique book is an essential resource for interdisciplinary research and scholarship on the phenomenon of feeling called to a life path or vocation at the interface of science and religion.”

Positive Psychology Books coming up in 2016

Emma Seppälä: The Happiness Track: How to Apply the Science of Happiness to Accelerate Your Success. Emma is the Science Director of Stanford’s Center for Compassion and Altruism Research and Education and founder of Fulfillment Daily. About the book:

“Drawing on the latest findings from the fields of cognitive psychology and neuroscience—research on happiness, resilience, willpower, compassion, positive stress, creativity, mindfulness—Seppälä shows that finding happiness and fulfillment may, in fact, be the most productive thing we can do to thrive professionally.”

Angela Duckworth: Grit: The Power of Passion and Perseverance. If you are remotely interested in Positive Psychology, it is not necessary to introduce Angela, but for the sake of consistency in this article, she´s a professor at Penn´s Positive Psychology Center and a close colleague of Martin Seligman. About the book:

“Why do some people succeed and others fail? Sharing new insights from her landmark research on grit, MacArthur “genius” Angela Duckworth explains why talent is hardly a guarantor of success. Rather, other factors can be even more crucial such as identifying our passions and following through on our commitments.”

New Positive Psychology Books

10 Positive Psychology People to follow in the News

  1. IMG_3802Brett Steenbarger regularly writes on Forbes about the psychology of stock trading and manages to sneak in little gems of Positive Psychology very frequently.
  2. Jessica Amortegui is a management coach and was in my Penn MAPP class. She covers the use of Positive Psychology in business on Fast Company.
  3. Emily Esfahani Smith was an assistant instructor in my Penn MAPP class. She´s a full-time journalist/writer and publishes beautifully crafted, Positive Psychology-influenced pieces via The Atlantic (among other media outlets).
  4. Dan Bowling also was an assistant instructor in my Penn MAPP class. In his former life, he was the SVP of Human Resources at Coca-Cola. He frequently publishes pieces on talent management seen through the lens of Positive Psychology.
  5. Emma Seppälä is the Associate Director of Stanford´s Center for Compassion and Altruism Research and Education (CCARE) and runs the website Fulfillment Daily – but also publishes regularly on Psychology Today and the Harvard Business Review, mostly on the benefits of mindfulness and compassion.
  6. Todd Kashdan is a professor of psychology at George Mason University. His work was featured in The New York Times and Washington Post, among other news outlets. He regularly blogs for Psychology Today on a wide range of Positive Psychology topics.
  7. Shelley Prevost is, among other things, partner at a venture capital firm. She writes Positive Psychology-influenced pieces on the workplace for Inc.
  8. Oliver Burkeman is a British journalist and author who frequently covers Positive Psychology topics for The Guardian.
  9. Giovanni Rodriguez also writes for Forbes, on a wide array of topics, oftentimes on the intersection of Positive Psychology and tech.
  10. Drake Baer writes for Business Insider, covering, among other things, self-help and personal success topics. He often cites Positive Psychology research in his articles.

Bonus

CNN runs a series of articles by the name of Project Happy.

If you know any other interesting writers that regularly publish Positive Psychology stuff on big news outlets (not their own blogs), please leave a comment below this article.

Watch out for “Fulfillment Daily” – the Science-backed news Source on “The Good Life”

I´m excited! On June 15th, a new website will launch. It´s name: Fulfillment Daily. What it says on their website: Fulfillment Daily is a place to get science-backed inspiring news to benefit your own life, inspire others, and, ultimately, contribute to uplifting all of society. We envision a world in which everyone has access to the science of fulfillment.

Fulfillment

Among the regular contributors will be some top experts in the field of Positive Psychology. And … um … well … me. The project´s founder is Emma Seppälä, Associate Director at Stanford´s Center for Compassion and Altruism Research and Education. Among the group of writers are Scott Barry Kaufman, author of Ungifted: Intelligence Redefined, Emilia Lahti, Queen of Sisu, and Wharton´s Adam Grant, author of Give and Take. How I managed to be among this group of magnificent people? I don´t know. The Lord moves in mappalicious ways…

You can also follow Fulfillment Daily on Facebook and Twitter.

Unfortunately, our Brains do not look like this. But wouldn´t it be nice?

Your Brain on Greater Good

This beautiful image was created by the beautiful people at Berkeley’s Greater Good Science Center. And no, our brain doesn´t look like that. But we all have the capacity to develop more of the qualities and entities depicted above. If you´d like to have more input, please watch Emma Seppälä´s (Stanford CCARE) TED talk on the “Science of Social Connection”: