Positive Psychology News Digest on Mappalicious | No. 18/2016

My favorite pieces covering Positive Psychology and adjacent from (roughly) the last seven days:

Bakadesuyo: What seven factors make companies more productive and employees happier? via Eric Barker


New York Times: ‘Grit,’ by Angela Duckworth by Judith Shulevitz


Guardian: How to be happy: follow these five easy steps by Emma Cook


CNN: Why millennials struggle for success by Angela Duckworth


Fast Company: Why innovative companies like Google are letting employees craft their own jobs by Vivian Giang


Greater Good Science Center: How Positive Media Can Make Us Better People by Sophie Janicke


Ideas.TED: 7 lessons about finding the work you were meant to do by Kate Torgovnick May


Positive Psychology News Daily: How to Have a Good Day by Lisa Sansom


Forbes: The Solution Focus: Turning Positive Psychology Into Your Positive Psychology by Brett Steenbarger


Fast Company: Four myths most bosses believe about employee engagement by Stephanie Vozza

News Digest - Mappalicious

Positive Psychology News Digest on Mappalicious | No. 16/2016

My favorite pieces covering Positive Psychology and adjacent from (roughly) the last seven days:

Sydney Morning Herald: The pursuit of happiness (at work) by James Adonis


Quartz: Schools are finally teaching what kids need to be successful in life by Jenny Anderson


Quartz: Happiness is the new GDP by Livia Gershon


Today: Happiness fueled by relationships, work, something ‘larger than self’ by Susan Donaldson James


WEC: Is “Psychological Danger” killing your team’s performance? by Lauren Joseph


Fast Company: Here’s why your idea of success might be making you miserable by David Mayer


Psychology Today: What the Best CEOs on Earth Do Better by Emma Seppälä


Psychology Today: The Kafka Effect by Nick Tasler


Atlantic: Is Grit Overrated? by Jerry Useem


London Business School: Non-financial assets key to 100-year-life, no author

IMG_7977

Positive Psychology News Digest | January – March (+130 Articles)

Mappalicious_Wordle_Q1_16Just in case you´ve missed some of my weekly updates – here are all the featured Positive Psychology-related articles from January to March 2016:

Time: The Most Inspiring Way to Be Happier and More Motivated by Eric Barker


New York Times: Don’t Grade Schools on Grit by Angela Duckworth


Harvard Business Review: 28 Years of Stock Market Data Shows a Link Between Employee Satisfaction and Long-Term Value by Alex Edmans


Tech.co: Study Finds Inner Kindness Is the Key to Success, Happiness by Cameron Glover (feat. Emma Seppälä)


Psychology Today: Why Is Happiness Fleeting? by Itai Ivtzan


The Atlantic: One Simple Phrase That Turns Anxiety Into Success by Olga Khazan


The Telegraph: Mental illness mostly caused by life events not genetics, argue psychologists by Sarah Knapton


The Guardian: Three things you think will make you happier at work (but won’t) by Charlotte Seager


TLNT: Is A Happy Workplace One Of Your Core Values? by Ron Thomas


Fast Company: How To Design Happiness: Experts from Lippincott, Disney, and SoulCycle weigh in on how they craft happy experiences by Mark Wilson


Greater Good Science Center: How Happy Brains Respond to Negative Things by Summer Allen & Jeremy Adam Smith


Fortune: The Massive Difference between Negative and Positive Leadership by Bill George


Washington Post: Why smart people are better off with fewer friends by Christopher Ingraham


Psychology Today: Where does the Word “Mindfulness” come from? by Tim Lomas


Philly.com: Swarthmore colleagues, students choose to honor an expert (Barry Schwartz) on choices by Justine McDaniel


Greater Good Science Center: Why Does Happiness Inequality Matter? by Kira Newman


Huffington Post UK: World Happiness Report 2016 Update – Five Key Implications for Education by Frederika Roberts


Forbes: How To Be A Happier Human Being Even When You’re Failing by Brett Steenbarger


Time/Money: Watching cat videos at work could make you more productive by Martha White


Huffington Post: Why Governments Should Stay Out of the Happiness Business by Ruth Wippman


Greater Good Science Center: You Will Never Find Work-Life Balance by Christine Carter


New York Times: Denmark Ranks as Happiest Country; Burundi, Not So Much by Sewell Chan


Fulfillment Daily: Happiness at Work: Get a Big Boost from Small Frequent Pleasures by Ron Friedman


Psychology Today: How Can Positive Psychology Be More Open to the Negative? by Todd Kashdan


Psychology Today : Expectations, Dopamine and Louis CK by Alex Korb


Quartz: This four-letter word is the Swedish key to happiness at work by Anne Quito


Huffington Post (Education): Why Being Tired of Grit is Tiresome by Stuart Rhoden


Chicago Tribune: Stanford psychologist tells us how to fight workplace burnout by Nara Schoenberg


Intelligent HQ: Why is Positive Psychology So Misunderstood? by Ana Teresa Silva


New York Times: Rethinking the Work-Life Equation by Susan Dominus


Inc: 7 things remarkably happy people do every single day by Peter Economy


Slate: A whole field of psychology research may be bunk by Daniel Engber


Brookings: Some good news for International Women’s Day: Women are (usually) happier than men by Carol Graham


Harvard Business Review: How to practice mindfulness throughout your workday by Rasmus Hougaard & Jacqueline Carter


Psychology Today: Positive Psychology: What Does “Positive” Mean? by Itai Ivtzan


Rewire Happiness: Transformative Technologies and Their Impact on Well-Being by Sophie Janicke


NPR: Is ‘Grit’ Doomed To Be The New Self-Esteem? by Anya Kamenetz


Washington Post: The worst kind of boss is not the one who’s always a jerk by Jena McGregor


Irish Times: Can you teach wellbeing? Martin Seligman thinks so by Ronan McGreevy


The Psych Report: The Paradoxes of Creativity: Sensitive Rockers, Mindful Daydreamers, and Celebrated Outcasts by Evan Nesterak


New York Times (Well): Why Doctors Care About Happiness by Danielle Ofri


Evening Standard: Older people are ‘happier in their late 60s’ by Hannah Al-Othman


PsyBlog: How To Naturally Boost The Brain Chemicals Sapped By Depression by Jeremy Dean


Quartz: Neuroscience says these five rituals will help your brain stay in peak condition by Vivian Giang


Positive Psychology News Daily: Workplace Positivity? What’s the Right Amount? And Why? by Donna Hemmert


Inc: Want to Be Truly Happy? Harvard Researchers Say This Is the One Thing You Need by Bill Murphy Jr.


Wharton Knowledge: The New Success Track: Happiness by Emma Seppälä


Huffington Post UK: It is Time to Embrace Stress as a Mental Wellbeing Issue by Simon Stevens


Greater Good Science Center: How Nature Can Make You Kinder, Happier, and More Creative by Jill Suttie


Fast Company: 7 ways turn your current job into your dream Job by Stephanie Vozza


New York Times: Testing for Joy and Grit? Schools Nationwide Push to Measure Students’ Emotional Skills by Kate Zernike


Washington Post: We all know exercise makes you live longer. But this will actually get you off the Couch by David Brown


Harvard Business Review: How to Build a Culture of Originality by Adam Grant


Psychology Today: Second Wave Positive Psychology: An Introduction by Tim Lomas


Think Advisor: Advisors in Pursuit of Happiness by Olivia Mellan


Psychology Today: Being Positive: It’s Not Mindfulness, It’s Savoring by Ryan Niemiec


Psychology Today: 4 Science-Backed Tips For Achieving Your Dreams by Emma Seppälä


Psychology Today: The Hard Data on Self-Love and Why It Leads to Success by Emma Seppälä


MIT Technology Review: First Evidence for the Happiness Paradox: That Your Friends Are Happier than You Are, no author


Inc: 11 Signs You Have the Grit You Need to Succeed by Travis Bradberry


Forbes: The Surprising Power Of Appreciation At Work by Chris Cancialosi


Greater Good Science Center: Can Helping Others Help You Find Meaning in Life? by Elizabeth Hopper


New Yorker: How People Learn to Become Resilient by Maria Konnikova


Wall Street Journal: ‘Resilience’ skills help you remain positive and productive under stress by Laura Landro


Forbes: Amy Cuddy: How Leaders Can Be More Present In The Workplace by Dan Schawbel


Boston Globe: How nice bosses get ahead by Emma Seppälä


Washington Post: What people around the world mean when they say they’re happy by Ana Swanson


Psychology Today: Re-setting Your Happiness Set Point Part 1 | Part 2 by Linda and Charlie Bloom


Talent Management: 6 Resolutions for Career Happiness in 2016 by Dan Bowling


PsyBlog: 33 Surprisingly Simple Things That Make People Happiest by Jeremy Dean


NBC News: United Arab Emirates Names Official ‘Minister for Happiness’ by Alex Johnson


Scientific American: How to Be an Optimal Human by Scott Barry Kaufman


Scientific American Mind: Can Positive Thinking Be Negative? by Scott Lilienfeld


The Guardian: Banish those midlife blues – the secret to happiness starts with one small step by Tracy McVeigh


Washington Post: The end of college rankings as we know them by Jeffrey Selingo


Washington Post: A Stanford psychologist explains why spacing out and goofing off is so good for you by Emma Seppälä


Penn Current: Penn professor explores what it means to be positive by Michele Berger


Financial Times: Companies with a purpose beyond profit tend to make more money by Simon Caulkin


Greater Good Science Center: Five Ways to Put Self-Compassion into Therapy by Tim Desmond


Gizmodo: English is Surprisingly Devoid of Emotionally Positive Words by George Dvorsky


New York Times: How to Raise a Creative Child. Step One: Back Off by Adam Grant


Psychology Today: Is It a Good Idea To Build on Signature Strengths? by Todd Kashdan


Scientific American: The Differences Between Happiness and Meaning in Life by Scott Barry Kaufman


Psychology Today: Can You Help Others Find Meaning In Their Work? by Michelle McQuaid


Cosmopolitan: 12 Ways to Feel Happier at Work – Yes, even at the job you hate by Judith Ohikuare


Psychology Today: The Surprising Link Between Compassion and Success by Emma Seppälä


Forbes: How To Light The Fire When You’re Burned Out by Brett Steenbarger


New York Times: You Are Stronger Than You (and Your Therapist) Think by Michael Bennett


Scientific American: The Science of Healing Thoughts by Gareth Cook


The Guardian: Is mindfulness making us ill? by Dawn Foster


Penn Current: Q&A with Scott Barry Kaufman by Lauren Hertzler


Stanford GSB: Should Employees Design Their Own Jobs? by Louise Lee


Fast Company: It takes more than just being a good person yourself to inspire ethical conduct in employees by David Mayer


Knowledge@Wharton: Why Compassion Serves You Better Than Self-interest by Emma Seppälä


Fast Company: The Surprising Link Between Compassion And Success by Emma Seppälä


Forbes: One Powerful Step That Can Turn Around Your Trading Psychology by Brett Steenbarger


Greater Good Science Center: What Doesn’t Kill You Makes You Kinder by Jill Suttie


Quartz: The Stanford professor who pioneered praising kids for effort says we’ve totally missed the point by Jenny Anderson


Harvard Business Review: Manage your Emotional Culture by Sigal Barsade & Olivia O’Neill


Harvard Business Review: We Learn More When We Learn Together by Jane Dutton & Emily Heaphy


New York Times: Why I Taught Myself to Procrastinate by Adam Grant


Fulfillment Daily: The Surprising Benefit Of Going Through Hard Times by Carolyn Gregoire


PositiveSharing.com: The 5 most important findings from the science of happiness that apply at work by Alexander Kjerulf


Forbes: Mapping World Happiness And Conflict Through Global News And Image Mining by Kalev Leetaru


Psychology Today: The One Thing To Know About Happiness by Andrea Polard


Psychology Today: 6 Surefire Ways To Increase Your Charisma – Backed by Science by Emma Seppälä


New York Times: Having Friends Is Good for You, Starting in Your Teens by Nicholas Bakalar


Quartz: In our pursuit of happiness, Americans are losing sight of what actually makes us happy by Geoff Chang


Forbes: How To Bring Presence To Your Biggest Challenges by Paula Davis-Laack


Harvard Business Review: Income Inequality Makes Whole Countries Less Happy by Jan-Emmanuel De Neve &  Powdthavee Nattavudh


BPS Research Digest: Follow your heart – Having an unanswered calling in life is worse than having no calling at all by Alex Fradera


New York Magazine: How Expressing Gratitude Might Change Your Brain by Christian Jarrett


Washington Post: Your relationships are just as important to your health as diet and exercise by Elahe Izadi


Huffington Post: The science of happiness: Everything you need to know about the feeling we all crave by Jason March et al.


New York Times: ‘Design Thinking’ for a Better You by Tara Parker-Pope


Fast Company: Countries Do Get Happier When They Get Richer–But Only If They Share The Wealth by Ben Schiller


Wall Street Journal: Latest Game Theory: Mixing Work and Play by Rachel Emma Silverman


Greater Good Science Center: How Humility Will Make You the Greatest Person Ever by Vicki Zakrzewski


Science Daily: Brain can be trained to regulate negative emotions, study shows, no author


New York Magazine: 3 Insights From a New Book About Creativity by Melissa Dahl


Psychology Today: 10 Questions to Help You Reflect on 2015 by Paula Davis-Laack


Harvard Business Review: Strengths-Based Coaching Can Actually Weaken You by Tomas Chamorro-Premuzic


New York Times: How to Cultivate the Art of Serendipity by Pagan Kennedy


Business Insider: A Harvard psychiatrist says 3 things are the secret to real happiness by Tanya Lewis


Greater Good Science Center: To Change Yourself, Change Your World by Kira Newman


Psychology Today: 3 Things Extraordinary Leaders Do by Emma Seppälä


Fulfillment Daily: The Joy of Imperfection: How Not to Drive Yourself and Others Nuts in 2016 by Mona Shah Joshi


Positive Psychology News Daily: Instead of a Resolution, Try a New Year Routine by Jan Stanley


Forbes: The Positive Psychology Of Job Interviewing by Brett Steenbarger

News Digest - Mappalicious

Positive Psychology News Digest on Mappalicious | No. 9/16

My favorite pieces covering Positive Psychology and adjacent from (roughly) the last seven days:

Evening Standard: Older people are ‘happier in their late 60s’ by Hannah Al-Othman


PsyBlog: How To Naturally Boost The Brain Chemicals Sapped By Depression by Jeremy Dean


Quartz: Neuroscience says these five rituals will help your brain stay in peak condition by Vivian Giang


Positive Psychology News Daily: Workplace Positivity? What’s the Right Amount? And Why? by Donna Hemmert


Inc: Want to Be Truly Happy? Harvard Researchers Say This Is the One Thing You Need by Bill Murphy Jr.


Wharton Knowledge: The New Success Track: Happiness by Emma Seppälä


Huffington Post UK: It is Time to Embrace Stress as a Mental Wellbeing Issue by Simon Stevens


Greater Good Science Center: How Nature Can Make You Kinder, Happier, and More Creative by Jill Suttie


Fast Company: 7 ways turn your current job into your dream Job by Stephanie Vozza


New York Times: Testing for Joy and Grit? Schools Nationwide Push to Measure Students’ Emotional Skills by Kate Zernike

IMG_7977

The Anatomy of Mappalicious – 2015

I’ve already posted an article listing the 10 most-read pieces on Mappalicious for 2015. On that note, I’m happy to announce that I did reach my goal of getting +100,000 pages views for the year. 2016, I want to see at least 200,000. That’s a stretch goal, but who knows what will happen. 🙂

So, here are some further stats for 2015.

How did people land on my blog?

Who brought traffic to Mappalicious
Clearly, Facebook brought the most traffic, and I’m pretty sure that a big chunk of that came from the Positive Psychology group. I also would like to thank Seph Fontane Pennock of PositivePsychologyProgram.com for being the only referrer to make the top 10 that’s not a social media site or search engine.

Where do my readers live?

Geography of Mappalicious readers
Most of my readers are from the USA, and additionally, some Commonwealth members make up big chunk (UK, Canada, Australia, India). Happy to see that my home country Germany made No. 2 even though the blog is written in a foreign language.

What keywords were my readers searching for?

Mappalicious search terms
Unfortunately, most search keywords are not disclosed. Other than that, one can see that a lot of people were looking for information on psychological constructs (hopefully, leading them to this page). Really happy to see Emilia Lahti, the Queen of Sisu, making this list.

What did people do after visiting Mappalicious?

IMG_7880

Most people went to Twitter, probably because they had been reading this list of some 100 Positive Psychology profiles to follow. Robert Biswas-Diener, co-author of The Upside of Your Dark Side, got the most clicks. Additionally, a lot of people went straight to Amazon,* hopefully buying tons of books. These three books received the most clicks:

*Note to myself: sign up with Amazon´s affiliate system…

From Penn with Love: The 3 Positive Psychology-Infused Books you need to read in 2016

Nico Rose - Angela Duckworth - Adam Grant2016 is going to be a really nice year for non-fiction aficionados. Below, you´ll find three upcoming books that were all written by researchers from the University of Pennsylvania: Angela Duckworth, Adam Grant, and Scott Barry Kaufman.

Originals: How Non-Conformists Move the World

by Adam Grant will be out on February 2, 2016. About the content:

How can we originate new ideas, policies and practices without risking it all? Adam Grant shows how to improve the world by championing novel ideas and values that go against the grain, battling conformity, and bucking outdated traditions. Using surprising studies and stories spanning business, politics, sports, and entertainment, Grant explores how to recognize a good idea, speak up without getting silenced, build a coalition of allies, choose the right time to act, and manage fear and doubt. Parents will learn how to nurture originality in children, and leaders will discover how to fight groupthink to build cultures that welcome dissent.

Here´s what Malcolm Gladwell has to say about the book: “Reading Originals made me feel like I was seated across from Adam Grant at a dinner party, as one of my favorite thinkers thrilled me with his insights and his wonderfully new take on the world.”

Grit: The Power of Passion and Perseverance

by Angela Duckworth will be out on May 3, 2016. About the content:

Penn - Books - 2016Why do some people succeed and others fail? Sharing new insights from her landmark research on grit, MacArthur “genius” Angela Duckworth explains why talent is hardly a guarantor of success. Rather, other factors can be even more crucial such as identifying our passions and following through on our commitments. Drawing on her own powerful story as the daughter of a scientist who frequently bemoaned her lack of smarts, Duckworth describes her winding path through teaching, business consulting, and neuroscience, which led to the hypothesis that what really drives success is not “genius” but a special blend of passion and long-term perseverance. She takes readers into the field to visit teachers working in some of the toughest schools, cadets struggling through their first days at West Point, and young finalists in the National Spelling Bee. She also mines fascinating insights from history and shows what can be gleaned from modern experiments in peak performance.

This is what Arianna Huffington thinks about the book: “At a time when our collective notion of success has shrunk to the point of being unrecognizable, Angela Duckworth arrives to restore it. With a mix of masterful storytelling and the latest science, she shows that perseverance and passion matter at least as much as talent and intelligence. And far from simply urging us to work harder for the sake of working harder, Grit offers a truly sane perspective: that true success comes when we devote ourselves to endeavors that give us joy and purpose.”

Wired to Create: Unraveling the Mysteries of the Creative Mind

by Scott Barry Kaufman and Carolyn Gregoire will be out two days from now, on December 29, 2015. About the content:

The book offers a glimpse inside the “messy minds” of highly creative people. Revealing the latest findings in neuroscience and psychology, along with engaging examples of artists and innovators throughout history, the book shines a light on the practices and habits of mind that promote creative thinking. Kaufman and Gregoire untangle a series of paradoxes – like mindfulness and daydreaming, seriousness and play, openness and sensitivity, and solitude and collaboration – to show that it is by embracing our own contradictions that we are able to tap into our deepest creativity.

What Martin Seligman has to say about the book: “Scott Barry Kaufman has just written the go-to book on creativity and genius. With Carolyn Gregoire, he puts together the newest scientific findings from the brain, from mental life and from the messy world of emotion to whiz us to the cutting edge of the highest human accomplishments.”

The New York Times on Positive Psychology and adjacent: My 10 favorite Pieces

New_York_Times_logo_variationI totally admire how top psychology researchers regularly get a lot of airtime in US mass media outlets – doesn´t happen that much here in Germany. The following list comprises 10 (more or less) recent pieces from the venerable New York Times. All of them were written (or cover work) by some of the figureheads of Positive Psychology.

Positive Psychotherapy: A Collection of 5 Research Articles

Positive PsychotherapyPositive Psychology was founded on the belief that there is (or at least has been) an imbalance with regard to the amount of attention researchers and practitioners in the field of psychology give to the positive versus negative phenomena in (human) life (for some insights on this, click here). For the first 100 years, psychological science has give much more attention to the negative continuum of experiences (e.g., how to get rid of depression) than to the positive side (e.g., how to lead and sustain a happy and fulfilled life).
Nevertheless, just some years after Positive Psychology’s “inception”, some researchers and practitioners took the newly developed theories, tools, and interventions from the subclinical arena – and tried to apply them in a clinical context, e.g., to help people who suffer from depressive disorders. Thus, Positive Psychotherapy was born.*

Here, you’ll find four of the most important articles charting this territory (links lead to PDFs). The fifth article is a very recent one, there’s no free PDF available as of yet. But if you’re interested: I’ve made very pleasant experiences by just e-mailing authors and asking for a copy. Enjoy!

*Even though Positive Psychology’s official year of birth is 1998 (when Marty Seligman was elected president of the APA), the term Positive Psychotherapy has been in use long before that time. If you’d like to learn more, please click here.

Positive Psychology and Me: Confessions of a Science Fanboy

So on most other days, I´m trying to write super-smart and meaningful stuff here, educating people about the science of Positive Psychology. This is not one these posts. The purpose of this one really is to show off. There, I said it…

I´m just beyond grateful for having had the chance to attend this year´s MAPP Summit which, at the same time, was a 10 years anniversary celebration for this special program at University of Pennsylvania. As usual, the rooms were packed with beautiful people from all walks of life who share the passion for all things Positive Psychology – and top-notch researchers in the field of Positive Psychology and adjacent.

For some folks, it´s a big thing to get a selfie with, let´s say, Beyoncé. But I´m a professing “Science Fanboy” – so the rest of the article is just a bunch of photos along the lines of “me with some super-smart/super-important person”. It´s the visual equivalent of a blog post I wrote last year when I graduated from the program: Positive Psychology and MAPP at Penn: Doing that Namedropping Thing. So if you are crazy about Positive Psychology and you feel a bit jealous after seeing this, it´s because you probably should be… 😉

Nico Rose - Martin Seligman

Seligman Selfie No. 1

Nico_Rose_Barry_Schwartz

Prof. Barry Schwartz of Swarthmore, author of “The Paradox of Choice” (among many other books)

Edward Deci and Nico Rose

Prof. Edward Deci of Rocester, Co-Founder of Self-Determination Theory

Nico Rose - MAPPsters

Sharing a laugh with past and future MAPPsters

Nico Rose - Martin Seligman

Seligman Selfie No. 2

Nico Rose - Angela Duckworth - Adam Grant

Two very brilliant and kind people: Angela Duckworth (who´s most notable for her research on Grit, and Adam Grant, author of “Give & Take”. By the way, both will have new books out in 2016.

I had to leave a bit early, therefore I didn´t get the chance to take a photo with Kelly McGonigal who also presented at the MAPP Summit – but I guess there will be a time for that in the future…