Marty Seligman´s Memoir “The Hope Circuit” is out now!

Hope_CircuitThe “Spiritus Rector” of Positive Psychology, Martin Seligman, has authored his autobiography. It´s called The Hope Circuit and was published with the imprint Public Affairs. I was able to read an early draft and can say it´s a fasninating read – not only for people interested in Positive Psychology, but also in psychology and science in general.

Scott Barry Kaufman, a former co-worker at the Penn Positive Psychology Center has written a candid and extensive review for Scientific American. Enjoy!

Competing with Skills, Winning with Confidence

Nico Rose | Sebastian Thrun | Udacity IntersectThis was the motto of the panel discussion I participated in during the morning session of Udacity Intersect 2018. The panel was hosted by Kathleen Mullaney, VP of Careers at Udacity. The other panelists were:

  • Aubrey Blanche, Global Head of Diversity & Inclusion, Atlassian;
  • Aline Lerner, Co-Founder & CEO, interviewing.io;
  • Chapman Snowden, CEO of Travr.se.

We covered questions such as:

  • How to project confidence during a job interview?
  • How to successfully apply when you have non-linear CV?
  • How to approach continuous learning in the ever-changing tech sector?

The panel (as well as all the other keynotes and panels) can be found on YouTube.

Nico Rose | Udacity Intersect

How Applicants can find out if a Job will provide Meaningful Work using Tools from Positive Psychology

Yesterday, I was a panelist at the morning session of Intersect 2018, a phenomenal event along the lines of “Tech Conference x Career Fair x Learning Exhibition”. The conference is hosted by e-learning platform Udacity. You can watch the panel I participated in here on YouTube. The guiding theme was “Competing with Skill, Winning with Confidence”.

Nico Rose | Udacity Intersect

In the afternoon, additionally I hosted a breakout group on using tools developed in the context of Positive Psychology to ace a job interview – but also to find out what kind of jobs we should apply for in the first place. You can download the full slide deck here.

Towards the end of the session, I shared my ideas on how to use the final phase of a job interview (where applicants get to ask questions) to better understand whether the job opportunity will (most likely) provide a meaningful work experience.

In order to do so, I referred to a framework of meaning in work that was developed by Amy Wrzesniewski (and colleagues), one of my academic heroines. Based on decades of research, the framework posits there are four overarching drivers of meaning in work. They are thought to independently contribute to the experience of meaningfulness in a given work environment.

For my session, I tried to come with questions to ask the recruiter or hiring manager at the end of the job interview in order to assess the likelihood of the presence of each driver of meaningfulness in the prospective job environment. Here´s what I came up with. What do you think? What would you ask?

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Nico Rose to speak about Positive Psychology at Intersect 2018 by Udacity

On March 27, 2018, innovative online learning provider Udacity will once again their Intersect conference. In the morning, I will take part in a panel discussion on “Competing With Skills, Winning With Confidence”. In the afternoon, I will host a session on “Using Positive Psychology to ace your Job Interview”.

Dr. Nico Rose | Udacity Intersect | Positive Psychology

 

Get your Calendar for Mindful March from Action for Happiness

February 2018 has come to end – but do not fear, for our friends at Action for Happiness have issued another Positive Psychology-infused calendar. It´s time for Mindful March. You can get your printable high-resolution version here.

Mindful_March

You think being Successful will make you Happy? Science suggests it´s the other way round [Current Research]

Does Happiness Promote Career SuccessOnce I´ll reach x (…put in one of your personal or professional goals…) I´ll be happy. This is a popular equation many people believe in. It´s promoted by a lot of self-help books as well.

And it´s wrong – or at least incomplete.

One of the central tenets in Positive Psychology is that happiness (positive emotions) actually lead to success. Researchers Julia K. Boehm and Sonja Lyubomirsky gathered the extant scientific evidence supporting this hypothesis for an influential review article in 2008. Ten years later they revisited this article and integrated new findings that corrobate their initial stance: Does Happiness Promote Career Success? Revisiting the Evidence. Here´s an excerpt from the discussion section:

First, the cross-sectional literature supports a correlational link between happiness and various success-related outcomes. Happiness is positively associated with job autonomy, job satisfaction, job performance, prosocial behavior, social support, popularity, and income. Happy people also receive more positive peer and supervisor evaluations […].

Second, […] longitudinal research suggests that people who are happy at an initial time point are more likely to find employment, be satisfied with their jobs, acquire higher status, perform well, be productive, receive social support, be evaluated positively, engage in fewer withdrawal behaviors, and obtain higher income at a subsequent time point.

Finally, […] experimental research demonstrates that when people are randomly assigned to experience positive emotions, they negotiate more collaboratively, set higher goals for themselves, persist at difficult tasks longer, evaluate themselves and others more favorably, help others more, and demonstrate greater creativity and curiosity than people assigned to experience neutral or negative emotions.